New patient chart to save 6,000 lives a year in the UK

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For more than a century doctors have been recording patients’ “vital signs” – temperature, blood pressure, heart rate – on the chart at the foot of the hospital bed, and then failing to act on what they found.

 

Yesterday, two UK Royal Medical Colleges became the first in the world to introduce a new way of displaying the measurements to compel action which is expected to halve avoidable deaths in hospital, saving at least 6,000 lives a year in the UK.

 

The simple innovation was described yesterday as a “step change” in patient safety. As well as saving lives it is expected to shorten hospital stays, improve the experience for patients and lower costs.

See on www.independent.co.uk

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Ending AIDS: Is There an App for That?

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The AIDS 2012 conference devoted a session on Wednesday to the topic, mHealth 101: An Introduction to Mobile Technologies for HIV/AIDS Programs.” Speakers explored the “uses of mobile phones in HIV interventions, including supporting adherence to medication regimes; patient follow-up; social networking to encourage dialogue around love, sex and relationships; prevention through health messaging; referrals; data collection and analysis; and clinical decision support.” Read more about the speakers and view their PowerPoint presentations here. (http://pag.aids2012.org/session.aspx?s=80)

 

health professionals and non-governmental organization leaders are “already starting to see how mobile health innovations can lead to new breakthroughs in the fight against HIV/AIDS.

 

 The potential of social media and mobile technologies to re-energize the AIDS movement is clear. We need nothing less than an HIV prevention revolution, with social media and mobile technology at its core.”

See on aids2012.ucsf.edu

Is personalized medicine a myth? – CNN.com

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Combine wireless sensors with genomics and imaging, and you have technology capable of bringing on the “creative destruction” of medicine.

 

Your cell phone rings, and your brow furrows as you glance down at the caller ID.

Hello?

“Hello,” responds an automated voice. “There is a 97% likelihood that you will have a cardiac event within the next 12 hours. Please proceed to a hospital as soon as possible.”

See on edition.cnn.com

A New Tool for Writing: the Eyes

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A French scientist has discovered a way to help people write with their eyes in cursive script on a computer monitor.

 

A scientist studying optical illusions discovered a way that people can write with their eyes in cursive script on a computer monitor—an innovation that could help severely disabled people communicate more freely, and potentially lead to visual-control systems for pilots, drivers and surgeons.

 

“It is like drawing with a pencil, but without a tip,” said Jean Lorenceau, director of research at the French National Center for Scientific Research, who conducted the study at the University of Pierre and Marie Curie in Paris. His research was reported Thursday in Current Biology.

See on online.wsj.com

mHealth helps patients stick with the program

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Online programs providing cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) to people with mild depression and anxiety are proven to work, but the new myCompass site launched by the federal Minister for Mental Health this week has a big point of difference – it’s mobile.

 

Developed by researchers at the Black Dog Institute and the University of NSW and funded by the federal government, myCompass is a web-based program offering a range of modules to help people with moderate stress, anxiety and depression to identify triggers for their conditions and clinically validated methods to overcome them.

 

However, two of the main problems with online programs – or face-to-face therapy for that matter – is motivating people to stick with the program and recording moods and triggers in real time.

 

The myCompass program aims to overcome those barriers by using that most ubiquitous of devices, the mobile phone. According to one of the program’s developers, the Black Dog Institute’s Judy Proudfoot, myCompass is one of the few in the world that is using mobile phones to provide real-time monitoring for people undertaking web-based CBT.

 

“Mobile interventions are just starting to take off internationally, so we were at the forefront,” Associate Professor Proudfoot said. “I think our program is one of the few in the world, if not the first in the world, that is for adults with depression, anxiety or stress. myCompass is a self-help program and can also be used by GPs with their patients. It has the dual functionality.”

 

source: http://www.pulseitmagazine.com.au/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1089:mhealth-helps-patients-stick-with-the-program&catid=16:australian-ehealth&Itemid=327

See on www.pulseitmagazine.com.au

5 Strategies for Value-Based Care

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Creating a Coherent View: Evolent Health says organizations must integrate multiple sources of information, provide real-time alerts for ED admissions, and be able to transmit care manager notes to the appropriate providers

 

Prioritizing High-Risk Patients: Williams noted that organizations could model their programs off the success of a UPMC team who has been assessing patients for years by collecting data and processing it through a rules engine to create predictive models for readmission risks and risk scores.

 

Providing the Right Intervention by Building a Targeted and Tiered Intervention Portfolio: Evolent Health stratifies patients into buckets and creates a menu of interventions and care management operations to address particular patients. One key is to corral a team of R.N.s, social workers, and health coaches to create patient-centric workflows and prioritized outreach.

 

Engaging at the Appropriate Intensity Level: three levels of patient outreach.

-Routine care gaps can be addressed by social media, email, or conceierge ourtreach and scheduling.
-Medium intensity patients can be targeted with health coaches, social workers, nutritionists, pharmacy outreach, etc.
-High Intesity patients can be engaged by specialist care managers, home monitoring devices, chronic care clinics, or complex case management methods.

 

source: http://www.healthcare-informatics.com/article/5-strategies-value-based-care

See on www.healthcare-informatics.com

A Dashboard for OR Patient Safety Optimization

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In May of this year, leaders at the Saint Luke’s Mid America Heart Institute, a division of the 11-community-hospital Saint Luke’s Health System, based in Kansas City, Mo., went live with an advanced patient safety platform called OR-Dashboard, which was developed for Saint Luke’s by LiveData, Cambridge, Mass.

 

The installation, which went live in early May in all five of Saint Luke’s cardiac operating rooms, integrates information from critical clinical processes in the operating room (OR), enhancing overall workflow, with a focus on patient-centered care.

 

What were the overall objectives for creating the OR dashboard?

 

The most important objective was to improve patient safety. And one of the big things we’re going to see being helpful in the future is adherence to Joint Commission, CMS, and SCIP guidelines [guidelines from the Surgical Care Improvement Project, created and sustained by a consortium of organizations, including the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the Joint Commission, the American College of Surgeons, the American Hospital Association, and others], promoting workflow efficiency and productivity, and promoting effective communication.

See on www.healthcare-informatics.com